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Arthritis Rheum. 2002 Aug;47(4):372-9.

Acute low back pain self-management intervention for urban primary care patients: rationale, design, and predictors of participation.

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  • 1Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute for Health Care, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. tdamush@regenstrief.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the rationale and design of a self-management program for low-income, urban, primary care patients with acute low back pain. Issues related to recruitment and protocol delivery, and attendance patterns and predictors of program attendance are described.

METHODS:

Two hundred eleven adult patients (73% female; 60% African American) were recruited from primary care neighborhood health centers. Focus groups were conducted for program development, and participants then completed a baseline interview and were randomized into groups receiving either usual care or a self-management intervention.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine percent of the intervention group attended the self-management class. Significant predictors of attendance included being older, reporting less income, and not working for pay. Attendees did not differ from nonattendees on back pain severity, symptoms, health-related quality of life, self-management processes, or satisfaction with care.

CONCLUSION:

Effective minimal-contact behavioral interventions are needed to reach larger portions of the patient population.

PMID:
12209482
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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