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Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2002 Sep 10;104(2):129-36.

Comparison of the ICSI outcome of ejaculated sperm with normal, abnormal parameters and testicular sperm.

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  • 1Family Planning and Infertility Research and Treatment Center, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE(S):

To compare fertilization rates, quality of embryos, pregnancy rates (PRs) and outcome of pregnancies in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using sperm from ejaculates of normal and abnormal semen and testicular sperm of non-obstructive azoospermia.

STUDY DESIGN:

Four hundred fifty-four patients who underwent 454 ICSI cycles were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into three groups according to the quality and source of sperm. Patients in group 1 underwent 133 cycles of ICSI using ejaculated normal semen, group 2 underwent 235 cycles using ejaculated abnormal semen, and group 3 underwent 86 cycles using testicular sperm.

RESULTS:

The parameters were compared among the groups with respect to cycles induced by long (n = 160) and short (n = 294) protocol. In group 3, the fertilization and PRs were significantly lower than in all other groups (51.3 and 10.6% in the long protocol cycles, 53.3 and 5.1% in the short protocol cycles, respectively). There was no significant difference in the outcome of pregnancies in respect to abortion rates between different groups.

CONCLUSION(S):

The fertilizing ability of sperm in ICSI is highest with ejaculated sperm and lowest with sperm extracted by testicular biopsy. Also, the clinical PRs are significantly lower in ICSI with sperm from testicular biopsy. However, the outcomes of pregnancies are not affected by using surgically retrieved sperm from ejaculated semen.

Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

PMID:
12206925
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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