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Breast Cancer. 2002;9(3):231-9.

The role of contrast-enhanced MR mammography for determining candidates for breast conservation surgery.

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  • 1Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-Cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to assess the impact of preoperative magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) on the surgical determination of breast conservation treatment for breast cancer patients.

METHODS:

From September 1997 to March 2000, 57 consecutive breast conservation treatment candidates were prospectively evaluated with conventional imaging studies (mammography and ultrasonography) and preoperative MRM.

RESULTS:

In 47 of 54 (87% ) breast cancer patients breast conservation surgery (BCS) was indicated on the basis of mammography (MMG) and ultrasonography (US). However in 40 of the 54 (74% ) patients BCS was indicated on the basis of MRM. Thirty-eight of the 40 patients ultimately underwent BCS and only 1 showed a positive margin. There were 7 patients whose MRM findings suggested that more aggressive treatment than BCS was needed but for whom US/MMG suggested that BCS was appropriate. Five of the 7 patients underwent mastectomy rather than BCS based on the MRM findings, which were justified by post-surgical histological findings. Of the 2 remaining patients who underwent BCS, one had a positive histological margin and one had recurrence, both of which resulted in salvage mastectomy.

CONCLUSION:

Our study suggests that high resolution preoperative MRM provides more accurate information compared with US and MMG for selecting candidates for BCS. Using MRM as a routine staging tool may reduce unnecessary repeated excisions. A larger study will be required to confirm these findings and to define the patients most likely to benefit from breast MR imaging.

PMID:
12185335
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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