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DNA Seq. 2002 Feb;13(1):39-45.

Isolation and sequencing of a putative promoter region of the murine G protein beta 1 subunit (GNB1) gene.

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  • 1Molecular Neurobiology Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. kitanaka-hyg@umin.ac.jp

Abstract

The expression of the heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein beta 1 subunit gene (GNB1) is regulated by psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines. Since the up-regulation appears to be one of the candidate processes of sensitization, it is necessary to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of the GNB1 gene regulation for a better understanding the establishment of sensitization. In the present study, we describe the isolation and nucleotide sequence analysis of the GNB1 gene promoter region. We have isolated approximately 10 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse of GNB1 gene and found potential elements involved in putative transcriptional control of the GNB1, such as AP1, AP2, Sp1, cyclic AMP response element, and nuclear factor kappa B recognition sites, within the sequences 0.3 kb upstream from the putative transcription start site. This region was highly rich in G + C content, but lacked TATA or CATT boxes. Comparing the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clone with the human genome databases using the BLAST program a region containing putative exon 1 and promoter of the human GNB1 gene in chromosome 1 was found. The cloning and sequence analysis of an extensive portion of the 5'-flanking regulatory region of the GNB1 gene provides new insights into the factors involved in the regulation by psychostimulants of GNB1 expression.

PMID:
12180136
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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