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Cardiovasc Res. 2002 Sep;55(4):799-805.

The anti-malarial drug halofantrine and its metabolite N-desbutylhalofantrine block HERG potassium channels.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Room H6/354 CSC (3248), University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The antimalarial drug halofantrine has been associated with QT interval prolongation and with fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias in patients without known underlying cardiac abnormalities. A common target for QT interval-prolonging drugs is the human ether-a-go-go gene (HERG) which encodes the pore forming subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) current (I(Kr)).

METHODS:

We studied the effects of halofantrine (0.1-1000 nM) and its major metabolite N-desbutylhalofantrine (3-1000 nM) on wild type HERG K(+) channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells, using the whole cell patch-clamp recording technique.

RESULTS:

Halofantrine and N-desbutylhalofantrine blocked HERG K(+) channels in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 21.6 nM (n=31 cells) and 71.7 nM (n=18 cells), respectively. The development of drug block for both halofantrine and N-desbutylhalofantrine required channel activation indicative of open and/or inactivated state block. Drug washout or cell hyperpolarization resulted in minimal current recovery consistent with virtually irreversible binding. Using a ventricular action potential voltage clamp protocol, halofantrine and N-desbutylhalofantrine block of HERG current was greatest during phases 2 and 3 of the action potential waveform.

CONCLUSION:

We conclude that both halofantrine and N-desbutylhalofantrine cause high affinity block of HERG K(+) channels. Although N-desbutylhalofantrine has been suggested to be a safer antimalarial agent compared to halofantrine, our results suggest that the gain in the safety margin for QT interval prolongation-related cardiotoxicity is minimal.

PMID:
12176129
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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