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Mayo Clin Proc. 2002 Aug;77(8):748-53.

Optimism-pessimism assessed in the 1960s and self-reported health status 30 years later.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn 55905, USA. maruta.toshihiko@mayo.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the association between explanatory style, using scores from the Optimism-Pessimism (PSM) scale of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), and self-reported health status, using scores from the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36).

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A total of 447 patients who completed the MMPI between 1962 and 1965 as self-referred general medical outpatients and also completed the SF-36 thirty years later compose the current study sample. The associations between the scores on the SF-36 and the MMPI PSM scale were evaluated by analysis of variance and linear regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Of 447 patients, 101 were classified as optimistic, 272 as mixed, and 74 as pessimistic. Scores on all 8 health concept domains from the SF-36 were significantly poorer in the pessimistic group than in both the optimistic and the mixed group.

CONCLUSION:

A pessimistic explanatory style, reflected by higher PSM scale scores, was significantly associated with a self-report of poorer physical and mental functioning on the SF-36 30 years later.

PMID:
12173709
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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