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Emerg Med (Fremantle). 2002 Jun;14(2):171-4.

Is there a role for the use of pressure immobilization bandages in the treatment of jellyfish envenomation in Australia?

Author information

  • Department of Emergency Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia. Mark.little@health.wa.gov.au

Erratum in

  • Emerg Med (Fremantle). 2002 Sep;14(3):341..

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this paper was to review the literature relating to the use of pressure immobilization bandages in the first aid management of jellyfish sting in Australia and to attempt to make a recommendation about their use based on the current literature.

METHODS:

A descriptive review of all published cases of jellyfish envenomation in Australia was performed, with specific focus on the discussion of pressure immobilization bandages in the management of such cases. A Medline search was performed using the key words listed for this article. Selected articles were reviewed and further publications were identified from the published reference lists given in the selected articles.

RESULTS:

The published articles were grouped into three groups: in vitro evidence, case reports and editorial comment (either in journals or book). Fifteen references were identified that discussed the use of pressure immobilization bandages in the management of jellyfish envenomation. Other articles were identified that had significant management issues discussion.

CONCLUSION:

Most of the 'jellyfish' literature is in relation to envenomation by Chironex fleckeri. This jellyfish is usually found in tropical Australia and has resulted in the deaths of 67 people in Australia. The last death was near Cairns in 2000. Unfortunately, there are few good data on marine envenomations, with most of the literature being Chironex envenomation case reports. There are minimal data on the effect of pressure immobilization bandages on other jellyfish envenomations. There is no good evidence to support the use of pressure immobilization bandages in the management of jellyfish sting in Australia [corrected].

PMID:
12164167
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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