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Int J Neurosci. 2002 Jan;112(1):31-53.

Gold and its relationship to neurological/glandular conditions.

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  • 1Meridian Institute, 1853 Old Donation Parkway, Suite 1, Virginia Beach, VA 23454, USA.

Abstract

Despite increasing sales of gold supplements, and claims of benefits for neurological and glandular conditions, gold has received little attention in modern medical literature except as a drug for rheumatoid arthritis. Historically, however, gold had a reputation as a "nervine," a therapy for nervous disorders. A review of the historical literature shows gold in use during the 19th century for conditions including depression, epilepsy, migraine, and glandular problems such as amenorrhea and impotence. The most notable use of gold was in a treatment for alcoholism developed by Keeley (1897). In the modern medical literature, gold-containing medicines for rheumatoid arthritis are known to have occasional neurotoxic adverse effects. There are also a few studies suggesting a role for gold as a naturally occurring trace element in the reproductive glands. One small recent study demonstrated a possible positive effect of gold on cognitive ability. There is a need for more experimental and clinical research of the neuropharmacology and neurochemistry of gold, and for the exploration of gold's possible role as a trace element.

PMID:
12152404
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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