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Neurology. 2002 Jul 23;59(2):256-65.

Language dominance in partial epilepsy patients identified with an fMRI reading task.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurosciences, Children's National Medical Center, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. gaillardw@ninds.nih.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

fMRI language tasks readily identify frontal language areas; temporal activation has been less consistent. No studies have compared clinical visual judgment to quantitative region of interest (ROI) analysis.

OBJECTIVE:

To identify temporal language areas in patients with partial epilepsy using a reading paradigm with clinical and ROI interpretation.

METHODS:

Thirty patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, aged 8 to 56 years, had 1.5-T fMRI. Patients silently named an object described by a sentence compared to a visual control. Data were analyzed with ROI analysis from t-maps. Regional asymmetry indices (AI) were calculated ([L-R]/[L+R]) and language dominance defined as >0.20. t-Maps were visually rated by three readers at three t thresholds. Twenty-one patients had intracarotid amobarbital test (IAT).

RESULTS:

The fMRI reading task provided evidence of language lateralization in 27 of 30 patients with ROI analysis. Twenty-five were left dominant, two right, one bilateral, and two were nondiagnostic; IAT and fMRI agreed in most patients, three had partial agreement, none overtly disagreed. Interrater agreement ranged between 0.77 to 0.82 (Cramer V; p < 0.0001); agreement between visual and ROI reading with IAT was 0.71 to 0.77 (Cramer V; p < 0.0001). Viewing data at lower thresholds added interpretation to 12 patients on visual analysis and 8 with ROI analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

An fMRI reading paradigm can identify language dominance in frontal and temporal areas. Clinical visual interpretation is comparable to quantitative ROI analysis.

Comment in

PMID:
12136067
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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