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JAMA. 2002 Jul 10;288(2):216-21.

Real-time, universal screening for acute HIV infection in a routine HIV counseling and testing population.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicien, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7030, USA. cpilcher@med.unc.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cannot be diagnosed by routine antibody tests and is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice. However, HIV nucleic acid-based testing is widely used to screen for antibody-negative acute infection among low-risk blood donors.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the feasibility of screening in high-volume laboratories for acute and long-term HIV infection in a routine HIV testing population, in which HIV infection prevalence is low, using specimen pooling and HIV RNA reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Clinical diagnostic performance evaluation at a state-funded public health virology and serology laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 8505 consecutive individuals presenting for routine HIV counseling and testing during a total of 20 business days to simulate a month of testing in August and December 2001 at 110 publicly funded testing sites in North Carolina.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prevalence of acute and long-term HIV infection. Serum specimens negative by HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) were screened in pools by an ultrasensitive HIV RNA RT-PCR test. Results for individual HIV RNA-positive specimens were reclassified as true or false according to results of confirmatory testing.

RESULTS:

Of the 8505 individuals screened, 8194 had not previously tested HIV positive and had sufficient serum to complete the testing protocol. Of those, 39 had long-term HIV infection (prevalence, 47.6 per 10,000 at-risk persons [95% confidence interval, 33.8-65.0 per 10,000]). Of the 8155 at-risk individuals whose antibody tests were negative, 5 were HIV RNA positive. Four of those had true-positive acute infection (prevalence, 4.9 per 10,000 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-12.5 per 10,000]). All 4 were women; 2 developed symptoms consistent with an acute retroviral syndrome in the week after testing. Screening all specimens required 147 HIV RNA tests. Overall specificity of the strategy was 0.9999.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest the widespread diagnosis of acute HIV infections in a routine testing population is not only possible but feasible using specimen pooling and nucleic acid testing. These additional procedures may increase diagnostic yield by approximately 10% compared with conventional HIV antibody testing.

PMID:
12095386
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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