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Am J Public Health. 2002 Jul;92(7):1115-9.

Effects of hospital staffing and organizational climate on needlestick injuries to nurses.

Author information

  • 1Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, 19104-6096, USA. sclarke@nursing.upenn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study determined the effects of nurse staffing and nursing organization on the likelihood of needlestick injuries in hospital nurses.

METHODS:

We analyzed retrospective data from 732 and prospective data from 960 nurses on needlestick exposures and near misses over different 1-month periods in 1990 and 1991. Staffing levels and survey data about working climate and risk factors for needlestick injuries were collected on 40 units in 20 hospitals.

RESULTS:

Nurses from units with low staffing and poor organizational climates were generally twice as likely as nurses on well-staffed and better-organized units to report risk factors, needlestick injuries, and near misses.

CONCLUSIONS:

Staffing and organizational climate influence hospital nurses' likelihood of sustaining needlestick injuries. Remedying problems with understaffing, inadequate administrative support, and poor morale could reduce needlestick injuries.

PMID:
12084694
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1447200
Free PMC Article
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