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Am J Hum Genet. 2002 Sep;71(3):656-62. Epub 2002 Jun 21.

Mutations in two genes encoding different subunits of a receptor signaling complex result in an identical disease phenotype.

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  • 1Department of Molecular Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.

Erratum in

  • Am J Hum Genet. 2003 Jan;72(1):225..

Abstract

Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL), also known as "Nasu-Hakola disease," is a globally distributed recessively inherited disease leading to death during the 5th decade of life and is characterized by early-onset progressive dementia and bone cysts. Elsewhere, we have identified PLOSL mutations in TYROBP (DAP12), which codes for a membrane receptor component in natural-killer and myeloid cells, and also have identified genetic heterogeneity in PLOSL, with some patients carrying no mutations in TYROBP. Here we complete the molecular pathology of PLOSL by identifying TREM2 as the second PLOSL gene. TREM2 forms a receptor signaling complex with TYROBP and triggers activation of the immune responses in macrophages and dendritic cells. Patients with PLOSL have no defects in cell-mediated immunity, suggesting a remarkable capacity of the human immune system to compensate for the inactive TYROBP-mediated activation pathway. Our data imply that the TYROBP-mediated signaling pathway plays a significant role in human brain and bone tissue and provide an interesting example of how mutations in two different subunits of a multisubunit receptor complex result in an identical human disease phenotype.

PMID:
12080485
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC379202
Free PMC Article

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