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Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(2):CD001231.

Ambulatory versus conventional methods for monitoring blood pressure during pregnancy.

Author information

  • 1Latin American Center for Perinatology (PAHO-WHO), Casilla de Correo 627, Montevideo, Uruguay, 11000. bergeled@clap.ops-oms.org, ebergel@usa.net

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hypertensive disorders are among the most common medical complications of pregnancy and a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality world-wide. Blood pressure measurement plays a central role in the screening and management of hypertension during pregnancy. In recent years the validity of conventional (clinic) blood pressure measurement has been questioned and efforts have been made to improve the technique with ambulatory automated devices that provide a large number of measurements over a period of time, usually a 24-hour period.

OBJECTIVES:

To assess whether the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy improves subsequent maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes, women-newborn quality of life or use of health service resources, compared with conventional (clinic) blood pressure measurements. These effects will be assessed for the following subgroups: (1) Women at low or average risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (unselected). (2) Women defined as high risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. (3) Women with hypertension without other signs of pre-eclampsia. (4) Women with established pre-eclampsia.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, LILACS and EMBASE were searched. Date of last search: July 2001.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

All randomised trials comparing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring versus conventional (clinic) blood pressure monitoring in pregnancy. Quasi-random designs will be excluded.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Two reviewers evaluated all potentially relevant articles, examined each study for possible inclusion and assessed the methodological quality using the Cochrane guidelines.

MAIN RESULTS:

No trials included.

REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS:

There is no randomised controlled trial evidence to support the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy. Randomized trials with adequate design and sample sizes are needed to evaluate the possible advantages and risks of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy, in particular in hypertensive pregnant women. These trials should evaluate not only clinical outcomes, but also use of health care resources and women's views.

PMID:
12076403
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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