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Genetics. 2002 Jun;161(2):673-84.

The genetic basis of the interspecific differences in wing size in Nasonia (Hymenoptera; Pteromalidae): major quantitative trait loci and epistasis.

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  • 1Institut für Verhaltensphysiologie und Soziobiologie, Universität Würzburg, 97074 Würzburg, Germany. jgadau@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

Abstract

There is a 2.5-fold difference in male wing size between two haplodiploid insect species, Nasonia vitripennis and N. giraulti. The haploidy of males facilitated a full genomic screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting wing size and the detection of epistatic interactions. A QTL analysis of the interspecific wing-size difference revealed QTL with major effects and epistatic interactions among loci affecting the trait. We analyzed 178 hybrid males and initially found two major QTL for wing length, one for wing width, three for a normalized wing-size variable, and five for wing seta density. One QTL for wing width explains 38.1% of the phenotypic variance, and the same QTL explains 22% of the phenotypic variance in normalized wing size. This corresponds to a region previously introgressed from N. giraulti into N. vitripennis that accounts for 44% of the normalized wing-size difference between the species. Significant epistatic interactions were also found that affect wing size and density of setae on the wing. Screening for pairwise epistatic interactions between loci on different linkage groups revealed four additional loci for wing length and four loci for normalized wing size that were not detected in the original QTL analysis. We propose that the evolution of smaller wings in N. vitripennis males is primarily the result of major mutations at few genomic regions and involves epistatic interactions among some loci.

PMID:
12072464
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1462138
Free PMC Article
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