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Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2002 Jun 1;22(6):934-9.

Endogenous vitronectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promote neointima formation in murine carotid arteries.

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  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, USA.

Abstract

We examined the roles of vitronectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in neointima development. Neointima formation after carotid artery ligation or chemical injury was significantly greater in wild-type mice than in vitronectin-deficient (Vn(-/-)) mice. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation did not differ between groups, suggesting that vitronectin promoted neointima development by enhancing VSMC migration. Neointima formation was significantly attenuated in PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1(-/-)) mice compared with control mice. Because intravascular fibrin may function as a provisional matrix for invading VSMCs, we examined potential mechanisms by which vitronectin and PAI-1 regulate fibrin stability and fibrin-VSMC interactions. Inhibition of activated protein C by PAI-1 was markedly attenuated in vitronectin-deficient plasma. The capacity of PAI-1 to inhibit clot lysis was significantly attenuated in vitronectin-deficient plasma, and this effect was not explained simply by the PAI-1-stabilizing properties of vitronectin. The adhesion and spreading of VSMCs were significantly greater on wild-type plasma clots and PAI-1-deficient plasma clots than on vitronectin-deficient plasma clots. We conclude that endogenous levels of vitronectin and PAI-1 enhance neointima formation in response to vascular occlusion or injury. Their effects may be mediated to a significant extent by their capacity to promote intravascular fibrin deposition and by the capacity of vitronectin to enhance VSMC-fibrin interactions.

PMID:
12067901
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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