Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Jun;31(3):600-13.

Increasing inequalities in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among US adults aged 25-64 years by area socioeconomic status, 1969-1998.

Author information

  • 1National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, 6116 Executive Blvd, Suite 504, MSC 8316, Bethesda, MD 20892-8316, USA. gopal_singh@nih.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study examined the extent to which areal socio-economic gradients in all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality among US men and women aged 25-64 years increased between 1969 and 1998.

METHODS:

Using factor analysis 17 census tract variables were used to develop an areal index of socio-economic status that was used to stratify all US counties into five socio-economic categories. By linking the index to county-level mortality data from 1969 to 1998, we calculated annual age-adjusted mortality rates for each area socio-economic group. Poisson regression models were fitted to estimate areal socio-economic gradients in mortality over time.

RESULTS:

Areal socio-economic gradients in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality have increased substantially over the past three decades. Compared to men in the highest area socio-economic group, rates of all-cause and CVD mortality among men in the lowest area socio-economic group were 42% and 30% greater in 1969-1970 and 73% and 79% greater in 1997-1998, respectively. The gradients in mortality among women were steeper for CVD than for all causes. Compared to women in the highest area socio-economic group, rates of all-cause and CVD mortality among women in the lowest area socio-economic group were 29% and 49% greater in 1969-1970 and 53% and 94% greater in 1997-1998, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although US all-cause and cardiovascular mortality declined for all area socio-economic groups during 1969-1998, the gradient increased because of significantly larger mortality declines in the higher socio-economic groups. Increasing areal inequalities in mortality shown here may be related to increasing temporal differences in the material and social living conditions between areas.

PMID:
12055162
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk