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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2002 May 24;293(5):1431-7.

PPAR activators inhibit endothelial cell migration by targeting Akt.

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  • 1Department of Medicine/Cardiology, German Heart Institute Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany. goetze@dhzb.be

Abstract

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate lipid and glucose metabolism and exert several vascular effects that may provide a dual benefit of these receptors on metabolic disorders and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Endothelial cell migration is a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We therefore investigated the effects of lipid-lowering PPARalpha-activators (fenofibrate, WY14643) and antidiabetic PPARgamma-activators (troglitazone, ciglitazone) on this endothelial cell function. Both PPARalpha- and PPARgamma-activators significantly inhibited VEGF-induced migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) in a concentration-dependent manner. Chemotactic signaling in EC is known to require activation of two signaling pathways: the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-->Akt- and the ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK MAPK) pathway. Using the pharmacological PI3K-inhibitor wortmannin and the ERK MAPK-pathway inhibitor PD98059, we observed a complete inhibition of VEGF-induced EC migration. VEGF-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly inhibited by both PPARalpha- and gamma-activators. In contrast, VEGF-stimulated ERK MAPK-activation was not affected by any of the PPAR-activators, indicating that they inhibit migration either downstream of ERK MAPK or independent from this pathway. These results provide first evidence for the antimigratory effects of PPAR-activators in EC. By inhibiting EC migration PPAR-activators may protect the vasculature from pathological alterations associated with metabolic disorders.

PMID:
12054675
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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