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Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2002 Jun 10;103(1):53-7.

The immunophenotype of patients with recurrent pregnancy loss.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical Immunology, University School of Medicine, Jaczewskeigo 8, 20-950 Lublin, Poland. dorotak@mp.pl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to estimate the alterations in the phenotype of lymphocytes of women with unexplained pregnancy failures in comparison with healthy women.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Fourteen women with unexplained habitual miscarriages and 18 healthy, fertile women with the history of successful pregnancies were included in the study. The lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood and stained with monoclonal antibodies. The expression of selected surface molecules was estimated using the flow cytometric method.

RESULTS:

We found that the percentage of T CD4(+) lymphocytes, CD3(-)16/56(+) cells, and T CD8(+)11b(-) cells was significantly higher in patients with recurrent pregnancy loss in comparison with healthy women. The percentage of B-1 CD19(+)5(+) lymphocytes was also significantly higher in women with unexplained habitual miscarriages in comparison with healthy women. Furthermore, we found higher expression of CD25 molecule on T CD3(+) and T CD4(+) lymphocytes in the study group, when compared to controls. Moreover, the percentages of B CD19(+) and T suppressor CD8(+)11b(+) lymphocytes were lower in women with pregnancy failures in comparison with the control group. The percentage of T CD3(+) lymphocytes and T CD8(+) cells did not differ in both studied groups. Similarly, the expression of CD25 antigen and HLA-DR molecule on T CD8(+) did not differ in the study group, when compared to controls.

CONCLUSION:

Our results can suggest that the immunological alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss.

PMID:
12039464
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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