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J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2002 Jun;42(2):233-8.

Motives for exercise participation as predictors of exercise dependence among endurance athletes.

Author information

  • 1Physical Activity and Health Research Unit, De Montfort University, Bedford, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To investigate whether motives for exercise participation predicted exercise dependence (ED) among endurance athletes. The rationale for the study centred upon a test of the affect regulation model utilising constructs that form part of the Self-Determination Theory as predictors of ED. It was hypothesised that non self-determined motivation, specifically external regulation, would be predictive of ED.

METHODS:

DESIGN:

correlational design, with a time gap between predictor and dependent variables.

SETTINGS:

competitive sports environment.

PARTICIPANTS:

188 competitive endurance athletes were recruited from amateur sports clubs.

INTERVENTIONS:

none.

MEASURES:

the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire was administered before a training session to measure the predictor variables (motives for exercise participation), and the Running Addiction Scale was administered before a similar training session, one week later, to measure the dependent variable (ED).

RESULTS:

Multiple regression analysis revealed that the strongest predictor variable of ED was introjected regulation (beta=0.29, p<0.001), followed by identified regulation (beta=0.19, p<0.05). External regulation and intrinsic motivation were weak and non-significant predictors. The total variance in ED explained by the exercise participation motives was 15% (R(2)= 0.15).

CONCLUSIONS:

ED was predicted by motives that did not support the tenets of the affect regulation model. Results are discussed in light of the potential influence of exercise participation motives on ED and their implications for intervention strategies and diagnosis of the ED syndrome.

PMID:
12032421
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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