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Mycopathologia. 2002;153(4):179-85.

The impact of polyene, azole, and DNA analogue antimycotics on the cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis in HIV infection.

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  • 1Oral Biosciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Abstract

Oral candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection in individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Though Candida albicans is the major aetiological agent, non-albicans species such Candida tropicalis are now emerging as important agents of such infection. The Candida cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) is considered a critical factor contributing to its colonization potential and virulence. It is also known that brief exposure to sub-cidal concentrations of antifungal agents is a likely scenario in the oral environment where the administered drugs are diluted continuously due to the flushing action of saliva. Hence the objective of the present study was to compare the CSH of 10 isolates each of C. albicans and C. tropicalis from HIV-infected individuals following brief exposure (1 hour) of isolates to sub-therapeutic concentrations of nystatin, amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole and 5-flurocytosine. The CSH was assessed by a previously described biphasic aqueous-hydrocarbon assay. The mean percentage reduction of CSH of C. albicans following brief exposure to nystatin, amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole and 5-flurocytosine was 27.33 (p < 0.001), 21.34 (p < 0.05), 11.74 (p > 0.05), 18.4 (p > 0.05) and 14.64 (p > 0.05) respectively. The mean percentage reduction of CSH of C. tropicalis following brief exposure to nystatin, amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole and 5-flurocytosine was 33.81 (p < 0.01), 28.88 (p < 0.01), 12.6 (p > 0.05), 21.53 (p > 0.05) and 17.68 (p > 0.05) respectively. A significant interspecies variation in CSH was observed for nystatin and amphoterecin B. Overall the results reveal that the CSH of C. albicans is affected to a significantly lesser degree compared with C. tropicalis when exposed to the antifungals. These data further illustrate another mode of action of antifungals on Candida leading to a reduction in the CSH and thereby the yeast adherence to host tissues.

PMID:
12014477
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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