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J Pers Soc Psychol. 2002 May;82(5):835-48.

The regulation of explicit and implicit race bias: the role of motivations to respond without prejudice.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 53706-1696, USA. pgdevine@factstaff.wisc.edu

Abstract

Three studies examined the moderating role of motivations to respond without prejudice (e.g., internal and external) in expressions of explicit and implicit race bias. In all studies, participants reported their explicit attitudes toward Blacks. Implicit measures consisted of a sequential priming task (Study 1) and the Implicit Association Test (Studies 2 and 3). Study 3 used a cognitive busyness manipulation to preclude effects of controlled processing on implicit responses. In each study, explicit race bias was moderated by internal motivation to respond without prejudice, whereas implicit race bias was moderated by the interaction of internal and external motivation to respond without prejudice. Specifically, high internal, low external participants exhibited lower levels of implicit race bias than did all other participants. Implications for the development of effective self-regulation of race bias are discussed.

PMID:
12003481
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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