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Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2002 May;43(5):1358-66.

Identification of novel mutations causing familial primary congenital glaucoma in Indian pedigrees.

Author information

  • 1Hyderabad Eye Research Foundation, L. V. Prasad Eye Institute, L.V. Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, Andhra Pradesh, India. shirly@lvpeye.stph.net

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the possible molecular genetic defect underlying primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) in India and to identify the pathogenic mutations causing this childhood blindness.

METHODS:

Twenty-two members of five clinically well-characterized consanguineous families were studied. The primary candidate gene CYP1B1 was amplified from genomic DNA, sequenced, and analyzed in control subjects and patients to identify the disease-causing mutations.

RESULTS:

Five distinct mutations were identified in the coding region of CYP1B1 in eight patients of five PCG-affected families, of which three mutations are novel. These include a novel homozygous frameshift, compound heterozygous missense, and other known mutations. One family showed pseudodominance, whereas others were autosomal recessive with full penetrance. In contrast to all known CYP1B1 mutations, the newly identified frameshift is of special significance, because all functional motifs are missing. This, therefore, represents a rare example of a natural functional CYP1B1 knockout, resulting in a null allele (both patients are blind).

CONCLUSIONS:

The molecular mechanism leading to the development of PCG is unknown. Because CYP1B1 knockout mice did not show a glaucoma phenotype, the functional knockout identified in this study has important implications in elucidating the pathogenesis of PCG. Further understanding of how this molecular defect leads to PCG could influence the development of specific therapies. This is the first study to describe the molecular basis of PCG from the Indian subcontinent and has profound and multiple clinical implications in diagnosis, genetic counseling, genotype-phenotype correlations and prognosis. Hence, it is a step forward in preventing this devastating childhood blindness.

PMID:
11980847
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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