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J Hepatol. 2002 Apr;36(4):501-6.

Failure of Lactobacillus spp. to prevent bacterial translocation in a rat model of experimental cirrhosis.

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  • 1Liver Unit, Institut Malalties Digestives, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. bauert@med1.ukl.uni-freiburg.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients with norfloxacin is associated with emergence of quinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. We investigated whether an alternative strategy with Lactobacillus prevents bacterial translocation and ascitic fluid infection in cirrhotic rats.

METHODS:

CCl(4)-induced cirrhotic rats with ascites (n=34) were allocated to treatment with oral Lactobacillus strain GG at 1-2 x 10(9) cfu/day for 8-10 days (group LGG) or milk (group MILK). In addition, 20 cirrhotic rats were given a single dose of 15 mg norfloxacin orally and then allocated to Lactobacillus (group NOR-LGG) or milk (group NOR-MILK). Ten healthy rats served as control. After sacrifice the cecal flora were analyzed and the prevalence of bacterial translocation and ascitic fluid infection assessed.

RESULTS:

Cecal colonization with Lactobacillus was achieved in 90% of treated rats. The prevalence of bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes was 10% in control rats and 93, 84, 70 and 100% in groups MILK, LGG, NOR-MILK and NOR-LGG, respectively (P>0.1 for comparison of treatment groups), the prevalence of ascitic fluid infection was 60, 32, 40 and 40% (P>0.1). Bacterial translocation of Lactobacillus was observed in 24% of rats treated.

CONCLUSION:

Lactobacilli fail to prevent bacterial translocation and ascitic fluid infection in experimental cirrhosis in spite of successful intestinal colonization.

PMID:
11943421
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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