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Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs. 2002 Jan-Mar;25(1):43-57.

Middle-class mothers' perceptions of peer and sibling victimization among children with Asperger's syndrome and nonverbal learning disorders.

Author information

  • Family Research Laboratory & Department of Nursing, University of New Hampshire, Durham 03824, USA. liza.little@unh.edu

Abstract

This article describes the yearly prevalence and frequency of peer and sibling victimization as reported by a large national sample of middle-class mothers of children with Asperger's syndrome and nonverbal learning disorders. An anonymous, mailed survey was sent to families solicited from two national Internet sites for parents of children with Asperger's and nonverbal learning disorders using the Comprehensive Juvenile Victimization scale and three questions designed to measure peer shunning. The overall prevalence rate reported by mothers of peer victimization was 94%. Mothers reported that almost three-quarters of their children had been hit by peers or siblings in the past year and 75% had been emotionally bullied. On the more severe end of peer victimization, 10% of the children were attacked by a gang in the past year and 15% were victims of nonsexual assaults to the genitals. Peer shunning also was common. A third of the children had not been invited to a single birthday party in the past year, and many were eating alone at lunch or were picked last for teams. Peer shunning was significantly correlated with peer bullying and assault. The high rates of peer shunning and peer victimization reported suggest that children with Asperger's and nonverbal learning disorders may require further scrutiny and attention concerning their victimization experiences by peers and siblings. Implications for nursing professionals are reviewed.

PMID:
11934121
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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