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J Ultrasound Med. 2002 Apr;21(4):375-82.

Ultrasonographic findings correspond to clinical, endoscopic, and histologic findings in inflammatory bowel disease and other enterocolitides.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, University of Tübingen, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare results obtained by abdominal ultrasonography with clinical findings, including endoscopic and histologic findings, to evaluate the location and activity of inflammatory bowel disease, including disease controls in children.

METHODS:

Ninety-two ultrasonographic scans and 41 colonoscopic examinations with biopsies were performed in 78 patients (1 month to 17.8 years of age) with Crohn's disease (n = 26), ulcerative colitis (n = 21), inflammatory bowel disease of indeterminate type (n = 2), and disease controls (other intestinal disorders, including infectious and ischemic lesions; n = 29). Laboratory parameters for inflammatory bowel disease were determined, and disease activity was assessed by a combination of clinical and laboratory data. Bowel wall thickness and echo texture were recorded in a standardized way by ultrasonography and compared with endoscopic and histologic findings in a segment-by-segment comparison.

RESULTS:

Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in detecting patients with severe macroscopic lesions depicted on endoscopy were 77% and 83%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in detecting patients with severe histologic inflammation were 75% and 82%. There was a statistically significant correlation between maximal bowel wall thickness and disease activity score (P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Abdominal ultrasonography may be helpful in evaluating the location, severity, and inflammatory activity of inflammatory bowel disease in children and young adults.

PMID:
11934094
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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