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J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2002 Apr;34(4):417-9.

Cimetropium bromide in the treatment of crisis in infantile colic.

Author information

  • 1Dipartimento di Scienze Pediatriche e dell'Adolescenza, Università di Torino, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Torino, Italy. savino@pediatria.unito.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Treatment of infantile colic remains an open issue. In Italy, cimetropium bromide is used extensively to treat infantile colic. The aim of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was to investigate the effectiveness and side effects of cimetropium bromide in the treatment of infants with colic crisis.

METHODS:

Ninety-seven infants with colic were enrolled. The diagnosis of infantile colic in healthy infants with regular growth, aged 15 to 60 days was made according to the criteria of Wessel. The infants were divided into two groups, one treated with cimetropium bromide (1.2 mg/kg) and the other treated with placebo at onset of each crisis for 3 days. Duration of crying and side effects were recorded daily in a structured diary for the 3 days of therapy. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square and t tests.

RESULTS:

Eighty-six infants completed the trial. The average duration of crying for each crisis was 17.3 +/- 12.6 minutes in the cimetropium bromide group and 47.5 +/- 28.5 minutes in the placebo group (P < 0.005). Response to cimetropium bromide was 74%. Response to placebo was 33% (P < 0.05). Side effects did not differ significantly between the two groups, except sleepiness, which increased in the infants treated with cimetropium bromide.

CONCLUSION:

Cimetropium bromide was more effective than placebo in reducing the duration of crying in children with infantile colic. The use of the anticholinergic drugs, aside from the dicyclomine because of its dangerous side effects, should be revaluated for treating infantile colic.

PMID:
11930101
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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