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J Endocrinol. 2002 Apr;173(1):81-94.

Increased insulin sensitivity and upregulation of insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2 in liver of Ames dwarf mice.

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  • 1Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Junin 956, 1113, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

In the present study we have used hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice, which lack GH, prolactin and TSH, to investigate the consequences of the deficiency of these hormones on glucose homeostasis and on the initial components of the insulin signal transduction pathway in the liver. Ames dwarf mice displayed hypersensitivity to insulin since they maintained lower fasting glucose concentrations (73% of control values), had significantly reduced amounts of insulin (58% of control values), and exhibited an increased hypoglycemic response to exogenous insulin. Probably as a result of reduced insulin production, Ames dwarf mice displayed intolerance to glucose. The insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) tended to be increased in the liver of Ames dwarf mice, while IR receptor protein content was increased by 38%. Insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2 was increased by 61 and 72% respectively, while IRS-1 and IRS-2 protein levels were increased by 76 and 95%. The insulin-stimulated association of the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase with IRS-1 was increased by 28%, but unaltered with IRS-2. Interestingly, while the insulin-stimulated phosphotyrosine-derived PI 3-kinase activity was not changed, insulin-stimulated protein kinase B activation was increased by 41% in this tissue. These alterations may account for the insulin hypersensitivity exhibited by these animals. The present findings in long-lived Ames dwarf mice add to the evidence that insulin signaling is importantly related to the regulation of aging and life span.

PMID:
11927387
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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