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East Afr Med J. 2001 Aug;78(8):433-8.

Prevalence of acute and persistent diarrhoea in north Gondar zone, Ethiopia.

Author information

  • 1Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 9086, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

A study was conducted to determine the magnitude of dysentery and persistent diarrhoea in children aged under-five.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional community-based survey was used to enroll the under-five children. A two-stage random sampling technique was applied to identify the households with under-five children.

SETTING:

The study was conducted from March to May 1997 in two districts of North Gondar Administrative Zone that is located in northwest Ethiopia. Two urban dwellers associations and twelve peasant associations were covered by the study.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 1101 under-five children were involved.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Bloody diarrhoea and diarrhoea that persisted for fourteen days or more were the main outcome variables.

RESULTS:

One hundred and ninety seven (18%) of the under five children had diarrhoeal attacks within two-week recall period. Sixty five (33%) of these had persistent diarrhoea. The prevalence of persistent diarrhoea was 6%. Of those who had diarrhoea, forty four (22.3%) had dysentery. Access to protected water source was significantly lower in children with diarrhoeal diseases than without (chi 2 = 4.31, p < 0.05). Significantly a higher number of children with diarrhoea had recent attacks of diarrhoea than those without diarrhoea (chi 2 = 176.82, p < 0.00001).

CONCLUSIONS:

A particularly high prevalence of dysentery and persistent diarrhoea was observed. Establishment of a simple surveillance system and taking of control measures to reduce the burden of dysentery is recommended.

PMID:
11921568
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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