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Cancer. 2002 Feb 15;94(4):1175-82.

Survival differences among Asian subpopulations in the United States after prostate, colorectal, breast, and cervical carcinomas.

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  • 1Northern California Cancer Center, Union City, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Information is limited for Asian subgroups regarding survival after diagnosis of the common cancers amenable to routine screening. The authors examined survival after carcinomas of the prostate, colon/rectum, breast, and cervix separately for Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, and non-Hispanic whites in the United States.

METHODS:

Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the authors compared the distributions of stage at diagnosis and computed 5-year cause specific survival probabilities, overall and by stage of disease, for cancer patients whose diagnosis was in 1988-1994 and who were observed through 1997.

RESULTS:

Among males, Filipinos were more likely to be diagnosed with advanced stage colorectal and prostate carcinomas than other Asians and non-Hispanic whites; they also experienced worse survival after these cancers. This survival deficit occurred across all stages of colorectal carcinoma and remained apparent within distant stage prostate carcinoma. Among females, Chinese were less likely to receive diagnoses of early stage colorectal carcinoma than Japanese and Filipinas. In addition, their survival was consistently lower across more advanced stages of disease. Chinese also experienced somewhat worse survival after diagnosis of early stage cervical carcinoma. Japanese were more likely to be diagnosed with early stage carcinomas but also tended to experience better survival after prostate, colorectal, and breast carcinomas regardless of stage.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chinese, Japanese, and Filipinos experienced unequal survival after these screenable carcinomas, indicating that certain groups may benefit from more aggressive screening efforts. The heterogeneity of cancer outcomes observed within the community classified as Asian reinforces the need for cancer statistics to be reported for disaggregated subgroups.

Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society. DOI 10.1002/cncr.10319

PMID:
11920489
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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