Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Infect Dis. 2002 Apr 1;185(7):971-9. Epub 2002 Mar 11.

Absolute levels and ratios of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro predict clinical immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

Author information

  • 1Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana.

Abstract

The relationship between malaria-related outcomes and cytokine production in whole blood cultures associated with cellular immune responses and immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria was examined in a study in southern Ghana. Production of malaria-specific interferon (IFN)-gamma was associated with reduced risk of fever and clinical malaria. Protective IFN-gamma responses were induced by live schizonts but not by dead parasites. Production of malaria-specific tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was associated with reduced risk of fever during follow-up. Baseline levels of TNF-alpha and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced interleukin (IL)-10 were positively associated with hemoglobin concentration. IL-12 production was associated with reduced risk of parasitemia. PHA-induced transforming growth factor-beta production was associated with reduced risk of fever during follow-up. High ratios of proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory cytokines were associated with increased risk of fever and higher hemoglobin concentrations. Thus, absolute levels and ratios of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines influence susceptibility to infection, clinical disease, and anemia. These data contradict data from cross-sectional clinical studies and indicate a need for detailed analysis of the relationship between cellular immunity to malaria and resistance to disease.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk