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Am J Public Health. 2002 Apr;92(4):660-5.

Does a history of trauma contribute to HIV risk for women of color? Implications for prevention and policy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California-Los Angeles, 760 Westwood Plaza-NPI (Room C8-871C), Los Angeles, CA 90024-1759, USA. gwyatt@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We investigated history of abuse and other HIV-related risk factors in a community sample of 490 HIV-positive and HIV-negative African American, European American, and Latina women.

METHODS:

Baseline interviews were analyzed, and logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of risk for positive HIV serostatus overall and by racial/ethnic group.

RESULTS:

Race/ethnicity was not an independent predictor of HIV-related risk, and few racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for HIV were seen. Regardless of race/ethnicity, HIV-positive women had more sexual partners, more sexually transmitted diseases, and more severe histories of abuse than did HIV-negative women. Trauma history was a general risk factor for women, irrespective of race/ethnicity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Limited material resources, exposure to violence, and high-risk sexual behaviors were the best predictors of HIV risk.

PMID:
11919068
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1447133
Free PMC Article
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