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Curr Mol Med. 2001 Dec;1(6):733-7.

Beta-amyloid, neuronal death and Alzheimer's disease.

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  • 1Department of Neurology, Medical College of Pennsylvania-Hahnemann University, Philadelphia 19129, USA.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease that affects cognitive function in the elderly. Large extracellular beta-amyloid (Abeta) plaques and tau-containing intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles characterize AD from a histopathologic perspective. However, the severity of dementia in AD is more closely related to the degree of the associated neuronal and synaptic loss. It is not known how neurons die and synapses are lost in AD; the current review summarizes what is known about this issue. Most evidence indicates that amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing is central to the AD process. The Abeta in plaques is a metabolite of the APP that forms when an alternative (beta-secretase and then gamma-secretase) enzymatic pathway is utilized for processing. Mutations of the APP gene lead to AD by influencing APP metabolism. One leading theory is that the Abeta in plaques leads to AD because Abeta is directly toxic to the adjacent neurons. Other theories advance the notion that neuronal death is triggered by intracellular events that occur during APP processing or by extraneuronal preplaque Abeta oligomers. Some investigators speculate that in many cases there is a more general disorder of protein processing in neurons that leads to cell death. In the later models, Abeta plaques are a byproduct of the disease process, rather than the direct cause of neuronal death. A direct correlation between Abeta plaque burden and neuronal (or synaptic) loss should occur in AD if Abeta plaques cause AD through a direct toxic effect. However, histopathologic studies indicate that the correlation between Abeta plaque burden and neuronal (or synaptic) loss is poor. We conclude that APP processing and Abeta formation is important to the AD process, but that neuronal alterations that underlie symptoms of AD are not due exclusively to a direct toxic effect of the Abeta deposits that occur in plaques. A more general problem with protein processing, damage due to the neuron from accumulation of intraneuronal Abeta or extracellular, preplaque Abeta may also be important as underlying factors in the dementia of AD.

PMID:
11899259
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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