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Planta. 2002 Jan;214(3):406-13.

Molecular characterisation of a xyloglucan oligosaccharide-acting alpha-D-xylosidase from nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.) cotyledons that resembles plant 'apoplastic' alpha-D-glucosidases.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, UK.

Abstract

We report the isolation, sequencing and analysis of the cDNA corresponding to an alpha-D-xylosidase involved in the mobilisation of xyloglucan from the cotyledons of germinated nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.) seeds. The translated open reading frame (2,808 bp including the stop codon), gave a polypeptide of 935 amino acids. It included the sequences of eleven peptides obtained by endo-proteinase digestion of the protein, and a putative hydrophobic signal sequence characteristic of a protein that is directed through the plasma membrane. The deduced molecular weight of the translated protein was appreciably higher than the molecular weight determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting post-translational modification. The protein sequence showed high homology (76.0% identity over 896 amino acids) with a putative alpha-xylosidase sequence from Arabidopsis thaliana and there was homology with several alpha-glucosidases, notably those associated with the plant cell apoplast. The enzyme is a member of Family 31 of the glycosyl hydrolases and it fits into Clade 1 of the phylogenic analysis of alpha-glucosidases. Although in vivo the nasturtium enzyme catalyses mobilisation of cell wall xyloglucan, the homology of its primary sequence with alpha-glucosidases prompted study of its action on a range of alpha-glucosides. It was active against several alpha-(1-->4)-and alpha-(1-->6)-linked substrates, the former being hydrolysed faster. The functional and evolutionary relationships between this alpha-D-xylosidase and plant "apoplastic" alpha-D-glucosidases are discussed.

PMID:
11859845
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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