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Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2001 Dec;35(6):459-62.

Invasive urodynamic studies are well tolerated by the patients and associated with a low risk of urinary tract infection.

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  • 1Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. yr.logadottir@vgregion.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

An essential part of investigation of the lower urinary tract is pressure/flow studies (pQS). In fact, pQS is the only way of diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction. There is controversy regarding whether or not prophylactic antibiotic treatment is necessary. This prospective study was carried out in order to determine the frequency of infections and/or distress after pQS performed without the use of antibiotic prophylaxis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

One hundred and twenty-three patients were included in the present study, all males. They were requested to answer a questionnaire I week after pQS. Questions were asked concerning symptoms of voiding disorders, dysuria, hematuria, incidence of fever and the patient's acceptance of the investigation after the pQS procedure. Urine was obtained for culture immediately before the investigation and 3 and 7 days after the pQS.

RESULTS:

Forty-six per cent of the patients experienced some degree of transient dysuria after pQS. and 18.5% experienced voiding problems of varying nature. Five per cent of the patients had hematuria and 2.5% reported fever. Fifty per cent of the patients experienced some degree of discomfort during the pQS investigation, and 4.1% had positive culture and symptoms of UTI requiring antibiotic treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

PQS is well accepted by the patients and the regular use of propylactic antibiotics is not indicated. We recommend, though, that patients at risk for serious complications from infections (e.g. those with prosthetic heart valves) should receive prophylactic antibiotics.

PMID:
11848424
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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