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J Orthop Sci. 2002;7(1):84-90.

Effect of surgical treatment on physical activity and bone resorption in patients with neurogenic intermittent claudication.

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  • 1Department of Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan.

Abstract

The effect of surgical treatment on physical activity and bone resorption was examined in patients with neurogenic intermittent claudication. Nineteen patients, 50-77 years of age, with neurogenic intermittent claudication (mean, 162 m; range, 20-400 m) caused by degenerative lumbar disease were included in the study. Decompressive laminectomy alone was performed for 7 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and 5 patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLSL), and decompressive laminectomy, with a Graf stabilization system, was performed for 7 patients with DLSL associated with flexion instability. Clinical symptoms and levels of urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx) were assessed before and 12 months after surgery. Subjective symptoms, including low back pain, leg pain and/or tingling, and gait disturbance, as well as restriction of activities of daily living were significantly alleviated by the surgical treatment, resulting in an increase in physical activity. Urinary NTx levels were significantly decreased by the surgical treatment, from 63.1 +/- 16.9 (mean +/- SD) nmol BCE/mmol Cr to 52.1 +/-11.2 nmol BCE/mmol Cr (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that surgical treatment appears to alleviate the clinical symptoms and increase physical activity in patients with LSS or DLSL, potentially resulting in the suppression of bone resorption. Surgical treatment may contribute to the prevention of physical inactivity-induced osteoporosis in elderly patients with neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by degenerative lumbar disease.

PMID:
11819138
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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