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Brain Res. 2002 Feb 1;926(1-2):86-93.

Presence of thyrotropin-releasing-hormone-immunoreactive (TRHir) amacrine cells in the retina of anuran and urodele amphibians.

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  • 1Department of Fundamental Biology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Spain. bfanadon@usc.es

Abstract

The presence of thyrotropin-releasing-hormone-immunoreactive (TRH-ir) amacrine cells in the retina of amphibians is reported for the first time. The anuran and urodele retinas studied exhibit major differences in the distribution of TRH-ir cells. In the two urodele species investigated, most TRH-ir amacrine cells were located in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). These pear-shaped cells originate a dense TRH-ir dendritic plexus in strata 4-5 of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). A small number of TRH-ir amacrine cells were observed in the inner nuclear layer (INL). Most of these INL TRH-ir cells were multipolar neurons with radiating dendrites that originate a loose plexus in the IPL stratum 1. In the three anuran species investigated, most TRH-ir amacrine cells were located in the INL. Distribution of TRH-ir processes in the IPL of anurans was not so clearly layered as in urodeles, dendrites being observed throughout strata 1-5. In the toad retina THR-ir material was also observed in the outer plexiform layer, which suggests that toads may have some TRH-ir interplexiform neurons. In the frog and toad, TRH-ir fibers were also observed in the optic nerve, although their origin could not be ascertained. The number of TRH-ir amacrine cells per whole retina was higher in anurans than in urodeles, though urodeles have higher cell densities. The marked differences in distribution of TRH-ir amacrine cells observed between anurans and urodeles, and among the three anuran species, suggest different functions of TRH in retinal processing, perhaps related to the different specializations of the visual systems of these species.

PMID:
11814410
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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