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Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Dec;12(10):917-25.

Whole and refined grain intake and risk of incident postmenopausal breast cancer (United States).

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  • 1Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55454-1015, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the relation between whole and refined grain intake and risk of incident postmenopausal breast cancer. Findings from case-control studies of whole and refined grain intake and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer have been inconclusive.

METHODS:

The Iowa Women's Health Study is a prospective cohort study of women initially 55-69 years old that relates diet and other lifestyle factors to cancer risk. After exclusions a total of 29,119 menopausal women who answered a 1986 baseline and a 1989 follow-up questionnaire were followed for 9 years for incident breast cancer.

RESULTS:

Compared to women who at baseline rarely ate whole grain foods, women who habitually ate whole grain had a healthier lifestyle, including a higher likelihood of prior screening mammography. The multivariate-adjusted risk of incident breast cancer was 20% higher in women in the highest quintile of whole grain intake, compared to women in the lowest quintile of whole grain intake (95% confidence interval 0.95-1.5; p-value for trend = 0.03). No increase in breast cancer risk was found in women who had not undergone screening mammography before 1989; the apparent increase in risk was therefore likely due to increased use of screening mammography. Refined grain intake was not associated with breast cancer risk.

CONCLUSION:

Consistent with inverse but not statistically significant associations between whole grain intake and breast cancer in case-control studies, both whole and refined grain intakes are unrelated to risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in these Iowa women.

PMID:
11808711
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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