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Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2001 Nov;22(5):448-55.

A 16-year haemodynamic follow-up of women with pregnancy-related medically treated iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis.

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  • 1Department of Clinical Physiology, Stockholm Söder Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, S-118 83 Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

to evaluate clinical and functional long-term outcomes following pregnancy-related medically treated iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT).

DESIGN:

retrospective follow-up of patients identified through a registry search.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

twenty-five women underwent clinical examination, colour duplex ultrasound and computerised strain-gauge plethysmography on two occasions a mean of nine and 16 years after DVT.

RESULTS:

40% of the patients were completely asymptomatic and 52% had no clinical signs of venous disease after a mean follow-up of 16 years. The clinical signs were in general mild, and none of the 25 patients had skin changes or ulcers. Deep venous reflux was found in 36% of the patients; the same percentage at nine- and 16-years follow-up, and 24% had normal ultrasonographic appearance of all deep veins. None of the patients had plethysmographic evidence of outflow obstruction. There was a significant relationship between measures of venous reflux and the presence of leg swelling, but there was no clear relation between functional abnormalities and the extent of the initial DVT.

CONCLUSION:

even after 16 years there are relatively mild symptoms and signs of venous disease in women with medically treated pregnancy-related iliofemoral DVT. Our results do not support earlier stated opinions that these patients represent a particular risk group for developing post-thrombotic syndrome.

Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Limited.

PMID:
11735184
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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