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Transfusion. 2001 Nov;41(11):1390-2.

Arterial puncture phlebotomy in whole-blood donors.

Author information

  • American Red Cross Blood Services, Southeastern Michigan Region, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA. newmanb@usa.redcross.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An arterial puncture during whole-blood phlebotomy is a rare event. A series of arterial punctures was evaluated to determine the clinical findings and the incidence of complications.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

Arterial punctures reported by staff between January 1, 1999, and February 28, 2001, were evaluated. Follow-up interviews were done with the phlebotomy nurses to determine what the clinical findings were and what the incidence of complications was.

RESULTS:

Twelve cases of arterial punctures were identified from 410,000 blood donations (0.0029%; 1/34,000). Eleven cases had a fast blood-flow rate of <4 minutes; 9 units (75%) were bright red; and in 4 cases (33%), the needle was pulsating. One case was diagnosed because the donor developed a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm 3 days after donation. Four hematomas occurred, for an occurence rate of 33 percent (0.35% in the general donor population). There was also an association with newly trained staff.

CONCLUSION:

Fast blood-flow rate is the most common clinical feature after an arterial puncture. Bright red blood is usually, but not always, present, and a pulsating needle is sometimes present. Hematoma is a relatively common complication, and brachial artery pseudoaneurysms are rare, although one case was seen in this study.

PMID:
11724983
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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