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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Nov;33(11):1811-7.

Effect of resistance training on self-reported physical functioning in HIV infection.

Author information

  • 1Department of Community Health, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. roubenoff@hnrc.tufts.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess whether progressive resistance training (PRT) improves functional status, measured using a validated Physical Function Scale, in both wasted and nonwasted patients with HIV infection, and to compare the relative contributions of increased lean body mass (LBM) and increased strength with the change in physical function.

METHODS:

Six patients with AIDS wasting and 19 patients with HIV but without wasting trained three times per week for 8 wk, followed by 8 wk of usual activity. Physical function, strength, and LBM were measured at 0, 8, and 16 wk. Self-reported physical functioning was measured using the physical functioning subscale of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Significant improvements occurred in strength (1-RM averaged for four machines increased 44% in the nonwasted and 60% in the wasted patients, each P < 0.0001) and LBM (2.3% increase in the nonwasted and 5.3% in the wasted patients, each P < 0.05) with resistance training. Physical function increased significantly in the wasted subjects (6 points, P < 0.02) but not in the nonwasted subjects, so that at 16 wk the wasted subjects functioned at a higher level than the nonwasted patients (P < 0.05). Both increase in LBM (P < 0.001) and increase in strength (P < 0.001) were significantly and independently associated with increase in physical function.

CONCLUSION:

PRT increases functional status in patients with HIV wasting, both by increasing strength and by increasing LBM.

PMID:
11689729
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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