Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Anal Biochem. 2001 Nov 1;298(1):62-8.

High-throughput screening for identification of small molecule inhibitors of histone acetyltransferases using scintillating microplates (FlashPlate).

Author information

  • 1CRC Centre for Cancer Therapeutics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey, SM2 5NG, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The role of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) in the regulation of crucial cellular functions, e.g., gene transcription, differentiation, and proliferation, has recently been documented and there is increasing evidence that aberrant expression of these enzymes may have a role to play in the development of the malignant phenotype. The availability of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of HATs would provide useful proof of principle probes for further validation of these enzymes as drug discovery targets and may also provide lead molecules for clinical drug development. We have developed a microplate assay for HAT activity suitable for high-throughput screening. In the assay, following incubation of histone H3, [3H]acetylCoA, and enzyme (recombinant p300/CBP-associated factor expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein), radiolabeled histone was captured onto the walls of a scintillating microplate (FlashPlate) generating a scintillation signal. The assay was reproducible, amenable to automation, and generated a wide signal to noise ratio. Although antiacetylated histone antibodies were initially used to capture the radiolabeled product, it was subsequently shown that a signal was effectively produced by histone passively binding to the walls of the FlashPlate. This resulted in a simple "mix and measure" assay that is currently being used for the identification of HAT inhibitors.

Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

PMID:
11673896
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk