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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 Nov;55(11):922-31.

A diet containing rapeseed oil-based fats does not increase lipid peroxidation in humans when compared to a diet rich in saturated fatty acids.

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  • 1Section for Geriatrics/Clinical Nutrition Research, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the effects of a rapeseed oil-based diet containing an increased proportion of easily oxidised polyunsaturated fatty acids such as alpha-linolenic acid with a diet rich in saturated fatty acids on the degree of lipid peroxidation in the human body.

DESIGN:

A randomised cross-over study.

SUBJECTS AND INTERVENTIONS:

Nineteen healthy moderately hyperlipidemic subjects (six women and 13 men, age 50+/-8 y and body mass index (BMI) 24.5+/-2.6 kg/m(2)) were given a rapeseed oil-based diet (RO) and a control diet (SAT) rich in saturated fatty acids during two consecutive 4 week periods separated by a 4 week wash-out period. Biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants were analysed in plasma and urine.

RESULTS:

No significant differences in plasma or urinary levels of free 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha), plasma total 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) plasma hydroperoxides or plasma malondialdehyde were observed between the RO and SAT diets (P=0.14-0.95). A higher concentration of serum gamma-tocopherol was detected after the RO diet compared to the SAT diet (P<0.001), whereas the serum alpha-tocopherol concentration and plasma antioxidative capacity did not differ between the two test diets. The total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and LDL/HDL ratio were lower after the RO diet compared to the SAT diet (P<0.001), while HDL cholesterol and total triglyceride levels were similar after the two diets.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that a rapeseed oil-based diet rich in alpha-linolenic acid does not seem to increase the degree of lipid peroxidation in plasma and urine compared to a diet rich in saturated fats. This is possibly due to a sufficient content of antioxidants in the rapeseed oil diet to increase circulating concentrations of antioxidants that may protect unsaturated fatty acids from oxidation.

SPONSORSHIP:

Swedish Council for Forestry and Agricultural Research and Foundation for Geriatric Research.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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