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Gastroenterol Clin Biol. 2001 Aug-Sep;25(8-9):773-80.

[Adult to adult living-related liver transplantation. The Paul-Brousse Hospital preliminary experience].

[Article in French]

Author information

  • 1Centre Hépato-Biliaire, Hôpital Paul-Brousse, UPRES 1596, IFR 89.9, Université Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France. daniel.azoulay@pbr.ap-hop-paris.fr

Abstract

AIM:

Liver-graft shortages justify the development of adult living-related liver transplantation. The preliminary experience with this technique at Paul-Brousse Hospital is reported. PATIENTS ET METHODES: From January to July 2000, 7 adult to adult living-related liver transplantations were performed. Donors were 5 females and 2 males aged 20 to 53 years old (median: 41). A right liver graft was harvested in all cases. Recipients were 5 males and 2 females aged from 17 to 58 years old (median: 50) transplanted for viral cirrhosis (4 cases including 2 with hepatocellular carcinoma), subfulminant hepatitis (1 case), hepatocellular carcinoma on a healthy liver (1 case), and epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (1 case). Follow-up ranged from 41 to 157 days (median: 117 days).

RESULTS:

One donor had a biliary fistula that healed spontaneously. One donor had asterixis for 24 hours. The 7 donors are alive at home without any late complications. One recipient was retransplanted for hepatic artery thrombosis and 2 recipients had a biliary fistula that healed spontaneously. The 7 recipients are alive at home with normal liver function.

CONCLUSION:

Our experience and other reports suggest that adult to adult living-related liver transplantation is feasible with rare mortality and low morbidity in donors. Results in recipients are comparable to those obtained with cadaveric grafts. For a given patient the possibility of living related donation might extend the indications for transplantation without penalizing patients waiting for a cadaveric graft.

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PMID:
11598539
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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