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Mol Biol Cell. 2001 Oct;12(10):3031-45.

Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-anchored proteins and fyn kinase assemble in noncaveolar plasma membrane microdomains defined by reggie-1 and -2.

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  • 1Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, 78467 Konstanz, Germany. claudia.stuermer@uni.konstanz.de

Abstract

Using confocal laser scanning and double immunogold electron microscopy, we demonstrate that reggie-1 and -2 are colocalized in < or =0.1-microm plasma membrane microdomains of neurons and astrocytes. In astrocytes, reggie-1 and -2 do not occur in caveolae but clearly outside these structures. Microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation show that reggie-1 and -2 are associated with fyn kinase and with the glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-anchored proteins Thy-1 and F3 that, when activated by antibody cross-linking, selectively copatch with reggie. Jurkat cells, after cross-linking of Thy-1 or GM1 (with the use of cholera toxin), exhibit substantial colocalization of reggie-1 and -2 with Thy-1, GM1, the T-cell receptor complex and fyn. This, and the accumulation of reggie proteins in detergent-resistant membrane fractions containing F3, Thy-1, and fyn imparts to reggie-1 and -2 properties of raft-associated proteins. It also suggests that reggie-1 and -2 participate in the formation of signal transduction centers. In addition, we find reggie-1 and -2 in endolysosomes. In Jurkat cells, reggie-1 and -2 together with fyn and Thy-1 increase in endolysosomes concurrent with a decrease at the plasma membrane. Thus, reggie-1 and -2 define raft-related microdomain signaling centers in neurons and T cells, and the protein complex involved in signaling becomes subject to degradation.

PMID:
11598189
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC60153
Free PMC Article
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