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Sleep. 2001 Sep 15;24(6):665-70.

Insomnia and health problems in Canadians.

Author information

  • 1Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit, the Arthritis and Immune Disorder Research Centre, The University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and to identify the relative contribution of selected factors associated with insomnia in the Canadian population age 15 and older.

DESIGN:

Weighted analysis of cross-sectional data from the Canadian General Social Survey, Cycle 6, 1991. Prevalence estimates were calculated for the total and age-specific Canadian population age 15 and older. Multiple logistic regression techniques were employed to study the contribution of an array of sociodemographic, lifestyle, stress, and physical health factors to the experience of insomnia.

SETTING:

N/A.

PARTICIPANTS:

A representative sample of the Canadian household population age 15+ (n=11,924).

INTERVENTIONS:

N/A.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Twenty-four percent of the Canadian population age 15+ report insomnia. The following factors were associated with insomnia in multivariate logistic regression: female gender, being widowed or single, low education, low income, not being in the labor force, ever having smoked, life stress, specific chronic physical health problems (circulatory, digestive and respiratory disease, migraine, allergy and rheumatic disorders), pain, activity limitation and health dissatisfaction. Age was not significantly associated with insomnia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Insomnia was highly prevalent among the non-institutionalized Canadian population age 15 and older. A very stressful life, severe pain and dissatisfaction with one's health demonstrated the highest odds ratios associated with insomnia. Increasing age per se and lifestyle factors were not significantly associated with insomnia.

PMID:
11560179
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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