Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2001 Jun;27(12):1275-81.

Immune reconstitution assessed during five years after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Hematology, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Japan.

Abstract

Immune reconstitution is an important component of successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Immune reconstitution was evaluated for 5 years after transplantation. While the number of CD8+ T cells and CD56+ cells recovered early post transplantation, a low number of CD4+ and CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells and reversal of the CD4/CD8 ratio continued up to 5 years. Although early recovery of IgG and IgM was seen at day 100 post transplantation, serum concentration of IgA was below the normal range at 6 months and increased gradually up to 5 years. Development of acute GVHD did not affect the numbers of CD4+, CD8+, CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD29+ T cells, but the number of CD56+ cells in patients who developed grades II-IV acute GVHD was low. The number of CD4+ CD29+ T cells had a tendency to be higher in the patients with extensive chronic GVHD than in those without chronic GVHD 2 years after transplantation whereas the number of CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells was low in spite of the absence of chronic GVHD. Serum concentration of IgA was lower in patients with extensive chronic GVHD than in those without chronic GVHD at 180 days. The number of CD4+ CD45RA+ cells in 10-19-year-old patients was higher than that in 40-49-year-old patients. Response to the Con A and PHA in 10-19-year-old patients was higher than that in older patients at 1 and 2 years. There was no significant difference in the ability of immune reconstitution between related transplant recipients and unrelated transplant recipients. These results suggest that chronic GVHD and age of patients affected immune reconstitution post transplant.

PMID:
11548845
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk