Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Br J Dermatol. 2001 Sep;145(3):434-7.

Cutaneous larva migrans: clinical features and management of 44 cases presenting in the returning traveller.

Author information

  • 1Department of Dermatology, Middlesex Hospital and Hospital for Tropical Diseases, University College London Hospitals Trust, Arthur Stanley House, Tottenham Street, London W1P 9PG, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is the result of a nematode infection, and shows a characteristic creeping eruption. As travel to the tropics increases, many British citizens may be returning with this infection, which is often misdiagnosed or treated incorrectly.

OBJECTIVES:

To perform a retrospective survey of 44 cases of CLM presenting to the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in London over the last 2 years.

METHODS:

Cases were reviewed with regard to patient characteristics, source of infection, source of referral, clinical features and therapy.

RESULTS:

Most infections were acquired in Africa (32%), the Caribbean (30%) and South-east Asia (25%), but also in Central and South America. There was a history of exposure to a beach in 95% of patients and the median duration of symptoms was 8 weeks (range 1-104). Lesions mainly affected the feet (39%), buttocks (18%) and abdomen (16%), but the lower leg, arm and face were also affected. Multiple lesions were seen in seven of 44 cases (16%). Laboratory abnormalities were absent in all patients. Of 44 patients seen, four needed no treatment, 28 were cured by a single course of treatment, 11 required a second course of therapy and one patient was treated three times. Thirty-one patients received oral albendazole 400 mg daily for 3-5 days and 24 were cured (77%). Five patients received 10% thiabendazole cream topically for 10 days and four were cured (80%). Four patients received oral thiabendazole 1.5 g daily for 3 days and all required further therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

In view of the range of treatment regimens recorded, a randomized controlled trial comparing topical and systemic therapies is warranted.

PMID:
11531833
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk