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Circulation. 2001 Aug 14;104(7):762-7.

Decreased coagulability has no clinically relevant effect on atherogenesis: observations in individuals with a hereditary bleeding tendency.

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  • 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hemostasis affects ischemic cardiovascular disease through its role in formation of occluding arterial thrombi. Several studies suggest that hemostasis also might play a role in atherogenesis. We investigated whether individuals with an inherited bleeding tendency are protected against development of atherosclerosis.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

A total of 76 individuals with an inherited bleeding tendency (hemophilia and von Willebrand disease) and 142 healthy controls were included in the present study. Early atherosclerotic vessel-wall changes were quantified by measurement of intima-media thickness in the carotid and femoral arteries by B-mode ultrasonography. To validate intima-media thickness measurements, measurements also were performed in 77 individuals with clinically proven atherosclerosis and in 34 healthy, age-matched controls. A large difference in intima-media thickness was found between individuals with proven atherosclerosis and healthy controls, in particular for the femoral artery (difference for carotid artery, 0.16 mm; femoral artery, 0.53 mm). Comparison between patients with a bleeding tendency and healthy controls showed only minimally reduced intima-media in femoral artery in individuals with a bleeding tendency (adjusted difference, -0.078 mm; 95% CI, -0.17 to 0.018 mm). Subgroup analysis revealed that in subjects with moderate to severe hemophilia, vessel walls were thinnest (adjusted difference, -0.10 mm; 95% CI, -0.27 to 0.061 mm).

CONCLUSIONS:

Hypocoagulability caused by hemophilia or von Willebrand disease has at most a limited effect on atherogenesis.

PMID:
11502699
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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