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Psychol Rev. 2001 Jul;108(3):624-52.

Conflict monitoring and cognitive control.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania, USA. mmb@cnbc.cmu.edu

Abstract

A neglected question regarding cognitive control is how control processes might detect situations calling for their involvement. The authors propose here that the demand for control may be evaluated in part by monitoring for conflicts in information processing. This hypothesis is supported by data concerning the anterior cingulate cortex, a brain area involved in cognitive control, which also appears to respond to the occurrence of conflict. The present article reports two computational modeling studies, serving to articulate the conflict monitoring hypothesis and examine its implications. The first study tests the sufficiency of the hypothesis to account for brain activation data, applying a measure of conflict to existing models of tasks shown to engage the anterior cingulate. The second study implements a feedback loop connecting conflict monitoring to cognitive control, using this to simulate a number of important behavioral phenomena.

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PMID:
11488380
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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