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Yeast. 2001 Aug;18(11):1035-46.

Extensive chromosome translocation in a clinical isolate showing the distinctive carbohydrate assimilation profile from a candidiasis patient.

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  • 1Department of Biological Science, Nara Women's University, Nara 630-8506, Japan.


Variation of the electrophoretic karyotype is common among clinical strains of Candida albicans and chromosome translocation is considered one of the causes of karyotypic variation. Such chromosome translocations may be a mechanism to confer phenotypic diversity on the imperfect fungus C. albicans. A clinical strain, TCH23, from a vaginal candidiasis patient shows distinct carbohydrate assimilation profile, serotype B, no chlamydospore formation and an atypical karyotype (Asakura et al., 1991). To examine the taxonomic relationship among C. albicans, Candida dubliniensis and this strain, we sequenced the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The ITS1 sequence of TCH23 was identical with that of C. albicans but not of C. dubliniensis. Thus, strain TCH23 was classified as a variant of C. albicans with an atypical phenotype. The chromosomal DNAs of this strain were resolved into 13 bands on pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Using DNA probes located at or near both ends of each chromosome of C. albicans, we investigated the chromosome organization of this strain. Referring to the SfiI map of C. albicans 1006 (Chu et al., 1993), we found that seven chromosomal DNA bands in strain TCH23 were reciprocal chromosome translocations. One homologue from chromosomes 1, 2 and 6 and both homologues from chromosomes 4 and 7 participated in these events. One translocation product was composed of three SfiI fragments, one each from chromosomes 2, 4 and 7. We deduced the breakpoints of chromosome translocation from the physical map of this strain; between 1J and 1J1, between 2A and 2U, both ends of 4F2, between 6C and 6O and both ends of 7F.

Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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